Monday, 31 October 2011

Top 10 Craziest Environmental Ideas

Top 10 Craziest Environmental IdeasMany people have proposed wild ways to solve the myriad problems facing Earth, including water pollution, smog, mounds of trash and global warming. Ideas range from the rational (if not always easily implemented) to the downright zany. We've compiled a list of some of the wackier (or at least wackier-sounding) proposed solutions to today's environmental challenges.

Build Earth Some Sunglasses

Build Earth Some Sunglasses

Credit: null

When you're lounging on the beach on a sunny day with the sun's hot rays beating down on you, you may try to keep out the glare with a pair of sunglasses or a hat. Some scientists have proposed taking a similar strategy with our warming planet: putting a ring of sunlight-scattering particles or micro-spacecraft in orbit around the equator. The idea is that the ring would reduce the amount of solar radiation hitting the planet and counteract some of the warming induced by greenhouse gases. The wild idea would also be an expensive one, with a potential price tag in the trillions of dollars.

Give the Ocean a Dose of Iron

Give the Ocean a Dose of IronCredit: © Conservation International/ Scott Henderson

Here's the basic idea: Tiny photosynthesizing plankton in the ocean use carbon dioxide from the air to make food. When they die, they sink down to the ocean floor, taking the carbon with them. Because iron stimulates phytoplankton growth, some people have suggesting fertilizing parts of the ocean with iron to create huge plankton blooms to suck up some of the excess carbon dioxide we've emitted into the atmosphere. Several private companies have attempted ventures to dump iron into the ocean to sell carbon credits, but many scientists question just how effective the massive blooms are at trapping and storing carbon. Environmental groups have also warned that iron dumps may harm the local marine ecosystems.

Get the Ocean Moving and Mixing

Get the Ocean Moving and Mixing

Environmentalist and futurologist James Lovelock, creator of the Gaia hypothesis, recently added a scheme of his own to the somewhat zany list of proposed global warming remedies. Lovelock's idea is to use pipes to stimulate mixing in the world's oceans, bringing deep, nutrient-rich waters to the surface to feed huge algae blooms that would suck up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sink it to the bottom of the ocean as they died. This method would only be a Band-Aid though, Lovelock says, because warming will continue for some time, even if we stop emitting greenhouse gases today.

Fill the Air With Sulfur

Fill the Air With Sulfur

Credit: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

Certain types of aerosols, or tiny particles suspended in the air, are thought to have an overall cooling effect on the atmosphere. These particles intercept some solar radiation and scatter it back into space. The cooling effect on the Earth's climate can be seen after a volcanic eruption, which can spew millions of tons of sulfur into the atmosphere. Some scientists have suggested that we mimic nature and inject a bunch of sulfur into the atmosphere to counteract global warming. One problem with this plan is the increased amount of acid rain this would generate. Another is that sulfur would have to be regularly injected into the atmosphere to keep up the cooling, or global warming would pick up right where it left off.

Keep Worms in the Kitchen

Keep Worms in the Kitchen

Credit: Wikmedia commons user Michael Linnenbach

They're not just pets (or food for them) - worms can be made useful by putting them to work eating those bits of sandwich crust and apple cores from the garbage and turning them into compost. The compost can then be used in gardens and to plant houseplants. Los Angeles city employees have been keeping a plastic bin of the little wriggling creatures in their office to recycle their lunch leftovers. If you're not wild about keeping a worm farm in your kitchen, you could always compost the old-fashioned way with a bin in the backyard.

Bury the Carbon

Bury the Carbon

Credit: null

Since we have all this extra carbon dioxide building up in the atmosphere and warming the Earth, some scientists have proposed taking that excess gas and trapping it somewhere, perhaps underground in aquifers, coal seams or depleted oil and gas fields. (The method is already used to push up dregs from the latter.) To do this, carbon dioxide would have to be separated from plant emissions, compressed and injected into an underground tomb, where it could be kept for thousands of years. There are still questions of the costs involved in siphoning off carbon dioxide from plant gas streams though, and some environmental groups worry about the gas seeping out of the ground.

Live in Trash

Live in Trash

Credit: The Coca-Cola Company

No, this doesn't mean you should stop putting your garbage out every week and start living in an ocean of food wrappers and tissues. Rather, an engineer at the University of Leeds in England has created a construction material out of waste (for example, recycled glass, sewage sludge, and incinerator ash). These "Bitublocks" keep litter out of the landfill and could be used to build houses. They also take less energy to make than concrete blocks, their inventor says. Other scientists have proposed using waste material from poultry farms, such as chicken feathers, to make more environmentally-friendly plastics.

Cut and Cap Emissions

Cut and Cap Emissions

Credit: null

Cutting global greenhouse gas emissions by mandatory caps or a cap-and-trade system may not be scientifically zany, but it's been a political hot potato. Proposals to revamp pollution-emitting power stations, limit the amount of carbon dioxide that businesses, industries or countries can emit, or putting a tax on greenhouse gas emissions would bring emission levels down worldwide, and many countries have signed on to make the (voluntary) cuts called for in the Kyoto Protocol. But the United States in particular has objected to mandatory emissions cuts on the grounds that they will damage the economy, though some states, particularly California, have pushed for regulations on carbon dioxide.

Ban Plastic Bags and Light Bulbs

Ban Plastic Bags and Light Bulbs

Credit: David Gallo.

It may sound like a rash decision, but San Francisco, China and Australia have all jumped on board. China wants to rid the country of "white pollution" — the plastic bags that clog city streets and waterways. And Australia hopes to cut its greenhouse gas emissions and reduce household energy bills by phasing out sales of incandescent bulbs. Such measures have gained momentum within the last year with more governments considering taking measures against the wasteful bags and inefficient bulbs. But before you worry about how you'll carry your groceries or light your home, these measures promote alternatives: recyclable paper bags and reusable cloth ones and more efficient (and cost-saving) compact fluorescent bulbs.source

Saturday, 29 October 2011

Stunning pictures of global warming from the BBC documentary

It has already captivated millions, taking viewers on a spectacular polar expedition to the frozen wildernesses of the Arctic and the Antarctic.

And now the makers of the landmark BBC series Frozen Planet, bringing the natural world of the North and South Poles to the small screen, has given a tantalising glimpse of things to come with these stunning images from future episodes.

These incredible stills from the series reveal the frozen world as you have never seen it before - and may never see again, thanks to the onset of global warming.

This stunning image shows a pod of fish-eating Kller whales spyhopping among the breaking sea ice in AntarcticaComing up for air: This stunning image shows a pod of fish-eating K*ller whales spyhopping among the breaking sea ice in Antarctica

Narrated by Sir David Attenborough, the series explores the effects of  slimate change on the polar regions - and the lengths scientists are going to understand it.

The next episode in the seven-part series is to be screened on BBC 1 next Wednesday, November 2, at 9pm.

Eurasian ArticCracked surface: The largest ice cap in the Eurasian Arctic - Austfonna in Svalbard - is 150 miles long with a thousand waterfalls in the summer

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Not alone: Cameraman Mark Smith (left) with just the penguins for company while a this polar bear looks ready for action as she prepares to launch herself from the ice .

article-2054817-0E8E82D600000578-408_964x619Bear hug: A mother nurses her two cubs, caught on camera in a stunning aerial shot. Her milk reserves are running low as she has not eaten for five months whilst in the den.

two male elephant seals fight amidst a beach of king penguinsAwesome spectacle: Bones break and tonnes of blubber slam into each other as two male elephant seals fight amidst a beach of king penguins

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Hitching a ride: Adélie penguins on an iceberg surrounded by masses of floating ice, in western Antarctica (left), while the sky over the Arctic peninsula turns a deep shade of pink as the sun sets on another day .

mountainous landscape, their images mirrored in the waterOn reflection: A stunning scene shows penguins standing at the shore against a dramatic mountainous landscape, their images mirrored in the water.

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Lone wolf: A rare Arctic species on Ellesmere Island in Canada. These wolves are extremely remote and unused to humans (left), while an elephant sea flicks wet sand on to its back (right) to keep cool as king penguins on the shore in South Georgia look on

article-2054817-0E8E8DE000000578-841_964x711Close encounter: Filming killer whales from a boat in the Antarctic Peninsula. Some orcas are mammal hunters - they kill seals by working as a team to generate large waves that wash them off ice floes.

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Intrepid: Frozen Planet presenter Sir David Attenborough at the North Pole (left) while two bears test their strength during the autumn in Hudson Bay, Canada (right)

Lonely landscapeLonely landscape: The first sunrise of the year in the High Arctic archipelago of Svalbard is on February 15 or 16, after being beneath the horizon for several months.

Breaking freeBreaking free: A frozen Arctic river flows after six months locked in ice. The immense release of freshwater from the Arctic's waterways into the Arctic Ocean triggers the annual sea ice melt and fuels the mass migration of fish, birds and whales.

article-2054817-0E8E842400000578-927_964x477Showing them the way: A polar bear leads her cubs across the desolate landscape, perhaps in search of food .

A group of penguins appear to be startled by the sudden emergence of an orca spyhopping through the broken iceI spy: A group of penguins appear to be startled by the sudden emergence of an orca spyhopping through the broken ice.

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A nest built for two: A male Adélie penguin puts the stones in place and prepares for some female company (left) while the fur flies between these two bull seals as they battle it out for mating rights on the beach.

Cubs jumping into the water as the pack ice breaks up in the summer. Polar bears are actually marine mammals and are completely at home in the water as adultsLeap of faith: Cubs jumping into the water as the pack ice breaks up in the summer. Polar bears are actually marine mammals and are completely at home in the water as adults.

A polar bear gliding through the water in front of the Austfonna ice cap in Svalbard. Polar bears can swim for 60 miles in a daySolitary swimmer: A polar bear gliding through the water in front of the Austfonna ice cap in Svalbard. Polar bears can swim for 60 miles in a day.

The melting ice forms elegant ice sculptures which float across a glacial fjord in SvalbardDeep freeze: The melting ice forms elegant ice sculptures which float across a glacial fjord in Svalbard.

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Gliding over the waves: A black-browed albatross off the coast of South Georgia (left) while a grey wolf pup (right) sticks close to mum on Ellesmere Island, Canada.  

a species common along the Antarctic coast - collect stones for their nests. Thieves try to steal them, but this one has been rumbledCaught in the act: Adélie penguins - a species common along the Antarctic coast - collect stones for their nests. Thieves try to steal them, but this one has been rumbled.

Cameraman Mark Smith is surrounded by penguins as he films in harsh weather conditionsOutnumbered: Cameraman Mark Smith is surrounded by penguins as he films in harsh weather conditions. Frequent snow storms and winds of up to 150mph kept film crews on their toes throughout their four months working alone at Cape Crozier, Antarctica.

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Thursday, 27 October 2011

13 Excellent Titty Kitties

13 excellent moments in titties and kitties to make your monday a little less awful.

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Monday, 24 October 2011

It's Howl-o-ween! The dogs humiliated for schlocky horror fancy dress show

Even dogs can celebrate Halloween - and here's a show to prove it.

Canines of all breeds sent tongues and tails wagging as they took part in the 2011 Tompkins Square Park Halloween Dog Parade in New York on Saturday.

The field of around 500 very patient pooches was packed with inventive and hilarious costumes, including a stegosaurus, Don Draper from Mad Men and a bride.

A dog looks strained while posing as a pin cushion the 21st Annual Tompkins Square Halloween Dog ParadePainful? A dog looks strained while posing as a pin cushion the 21st Annual Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade

Jack the dog as Don Draper from Mad Men - not to be confused with a bankerMad dog: Jack the dog as Don Draper from Mad Men - not to be confused with a banker

A non-too smiley dog dresses as a stegosaurusJurassic bark: A non-too smiley dog dresses as a stegosaurus

The parade of masquerading dogs is the largest Halloween Dog Parade in the U.S.

A pup done up like Lady Gaga from the 2009 VMAs won a prize for being best dressed.

But the top dog gong of Best in Show went to a canine disguised as an M23 New York bus, fully equipped with its very own passenger, the owner's child.

The proceeds raised during the event go to the oldest dog run in New York City.

This corgi, dressed as an M23 New York bus, and his owner Ben, whose child was in on the costume, won 'Best in Show' at the eventThis corgi, dressed as an M23 New York bus, and his owner Ben, whose child was in on the costume, won 'Best in Show' at the event

This pooch went as Lady Gaga from the 2009 VMAs and won a prize for best-dressedThis pooch went as Lady Gaga from the 2009 VMAs and won a prize for best-dressed

This dog went all out by dressing up as New York CitySmall Apple: This dog went all out by dressing up as New York City

This pomeranian went as a sightseeing busOpen for business? This pomeranian went as a sightseeing bus

This four-legged friend went as Natalie Portman's Black SwanOscar winner? This four-legged friend went as Natalie Portman's Black Swan

Aircraft Carrier' and crew were in attendanceJazz the 'Aircraft Carrier' and crew were in attendance

article-2052574-0E7C8F6600000578-920_634x724Tank the English Bullodog as the 'Runaway Bride'

The parade of masquerading dogs is the largest Halloween Dog Parade in the U.S.The parade of masquerading dogs is the largest Halloween Dog Parade in the U.S.

Sarah Polgee and her pet Kiki go wackySarah Polgee and her pet Kiki go wacky

The proceeds raised during the event go to the oldest Dog Run in New York CityThe proceeds raised during the event go to the oldest Dog Run in New York City

Some owners even joined in with the costumes, such as these four inspired by the Wizard of OzSome owners even joined in with the costumes, such as these four inspired by the Wizard of Oz

article-2052574-0E7EA63600000578-273_634x903article-2052574-0E7EA71900000578-187_634x942This boxer as a bride was one of the funnier costumes on show

The pooch entered as a New York subway, complete with customary ratThe pooch entered as a New York subway, complete with customary rat

There was even room for a bulldog dressed, aptly, as a strongmanThere was even room for a bulldog dressed, aptly, as a strongman

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Monday, 17 October 2011

The 7 World’s Slowest Animal

Normally people will notice the fastest animal in this world, what about slowest animal? What do you think? I know there are some animals doesn’t move at all. That consider as slowest too? But here I will only post those movable animal. Check it out!

1 ) Slug (0.03mph)

Slug 01 Slug

The World Almanac and Book of Facts name slugs to be the slowest animals in the world. It only has a maximum speed of 0.03 mph. No wonder they have been considered a delicacy around the world. They make for an easy catch since prehistoric times. The soft, slimy bodies of slugs are prone to desiccation, so land-living slugs are confined to moist environments and must retreat to damp hiding places when the weather is dry.

2 ) Giant Tortoise (0.13mph)

Giant TortoiseGiant Tortoise 01

Giant tortoises are characteristic reptiles of certain tropical islands. They are one of the world’s longest-living animals, with an average lifespan of 100 years or more. The speed of a tortoise varies according to species. The slowest tortoises in the world have been clocked at only 0.13 mph to 0.30 mph. However, when they take to the water they increase their speed. They have been known to swim as fast as 22 mph.

3 ) Three-Toed Sloth (0.15mph)

Three-Toed SlothThree-Toed Sloth 01

Three-toed sloths are the only members of the Bradypus genus and the Bradypodidae family. Famously slow-moving, the sloth travels at a top speed of 0.15 mph.  Three-toed sloths are about the size of a small dog, with the head and body having a combined length of around 60 centimetres, and the animal having a weight of 3.5-4.5 kg. Unlike the two-toed sloths, they also have a short (6-7 cm) tail, and they have three clawed toes on all four of their limbs.

4 ) Starfish (8mph)

StarfishStarfish 01

The starfish is generally  found with 5 arms that are attached to a central disc. This central disc is the activity center of the starfish and also contains the mouth of the starfish. The starfish has the incredible ability to regenerate itself into a new starfish, with a single lost arm attached to a portion of the central starfish body disc!  Starfish do not rely on a jointed, movable skeleton for support and movement (although starfish are still protected by their skeleton), but instead possess a hydraulic water vascular system that aids the starfish in movement.

5 ) Manatee (13mph)

ManateeManatee 01

The manatee is a large marine mammal and the manatee is also commonly known as the sea cow. The average manatee can often weight more than 500kg and can grow to lengths of over 4.5 meters. Despite their large size it is not uncommon for the manatee to reach more than 70 years old.  The manatee spends most of its time grazing on plants in warm, shallow waters that are seldom deeper than a couple of meters. The manatee is a herbivore and therefore only really feeds on aquatic plants like sea grass and algae but it has been thought that certain species of manatee may eat smaller fish but not necessarily on purpose .

6 ) Gila Monster (15mph)

Gila MonsterGila Monster 01

The gila monster is a large species of lizard that is natively found in parts of the southern United States and northern Mexico. The gila monster has short powerful legs, and long claws which it mainly uses for digging. Gila monsters spend nearly all of their time in burrows underground, either ones they have dug themselves or more likely, those stolen from other animals. Gila Monsters eat  pinkie mice, baby rabbits, nestling birds and eggs found on the ground. Often, they enter a burrow and eat the nestlings of whatever it finds living there.

7 ) Koala Bear (25mph)

Koala BearKoala Bear 01

The koala is a slow-moving marsupial mammal and it is nocturnal. It’s hands and feet are specially adapted for climbing tree’s. The koala sleeps in the eucalyptus tree in the daytime, firmly grasping the limbs with their feet, clinging on with five sharply clawed toes on each foot.  This animal is not comfortable on the ground but it can shuffle along on its short legs if it has too. Instinct leads it to its mothers pouch where it feeds and remains until it is six months old. The koala is a protected species but it is still threatened by the loss of habitat due to man and seasonal brush fires. Koala’s message is the ability to climb over obstacles and hold on to what brings you security which should be a positive belief system.

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