Sunday, 13 June 2010

Maybe First Step in The Evolution of Alligators in Oceanic Waters

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. -- A South Florida photographer recently captured a rare sight on camera in the Atlantic Ocean off Palm Beach.


Laz Ruda photographed an American alligator in a reef about a mile offshore.
Regularly found in freshwater lakes and rivers, alligators can tolerate salt water, but only for a short span of time. The salt glands on the American alligator are nonfunctional, unlike that of the American crocodile, according to Ruda's website, TheLivingSea.com.


Ruda said he was 60 feet below the ocean's surface when he saw the alligator.
"As I cruised along the sand, from the hazy distance I could see a dark shadow," Ruda writes. "Not being able to discern its shape too well, I thought to myself, 'Holy cow! That's a huge stingray.'"

Ruda said when he got closer, he couldn't believe his eyes.

"This creature was so out of place that I thought it was nothing more than a well-planned out hoax by my good friends," he said.

Ruda was able to switch between still shots to high-definition video.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission was called out to investigate, but the alligator had swam away by then and could not be found.
Ruda said FWC officials told him that gators will sometimes make their way out to the ocean, but if they stay out too long, they will lose their sight due to the salt water and eventually starve to death.


Like most animals, it is this Gator's curiosity that allows me to capture these photographs as it approaches the strange camera contraption sitting in the water.


"There are no other Everglades in the world." - Marjory Stoneman Douglas.

Lets do our part to protect and preserve this river of grass so our children and future generations can also dazzle at its natural beauty.


My experience with alligators in the past couple of months has followed the same track as that of sharks... My sense of fear has been replaced with adoration, respect and amazement. Now if only I can convince the rest of the world. :)


Sighting this beautiful baby alligator resting on a fallen tree stump was one of the highlights of our visit to Jonathan Dickinson State Park.


Who would have thought that just under that dangerous looking face the American Alligator sports such a pretty smile.

Like the sharks, the American Alligator's toothy grin instills a sense of ominous danger. Yet after numerous encounters with this one particular wild alligator, it appears to approach me more out of a sense of curiosity than of predacious behavior.


Like the sharks, the American Alligator's toothy grin instills a sense of ominous danger. Yet after numerous encounters with this one particular wild alligator, it appears to approach me more out of a sense of curiosity than of predacious behavior.


There is an untold elegance to these not so distance cousins of the dinosaurs. Brought close to extinction in the earlier 20th century due to hunting for their precious skin, remarkably through conservation this species has regained its strength in population. They are commonly seen throughout the Everglades and range throughout the southeastern United States.


With a denture like that it is easy to understand why most people fear these animals who can reach a maximum length of up to 16 feet. While they have been known to attack humans, in most instances if not fed by humans, they will normally retreat.


I truly love this shot because it shows the gentler side of these apex predators of the swamp land. The diet of most juvenile alligators consists of small invertebrates, fish and frogs. They are opportunistic feeders who feed on carrion if available and hungry enough. It is quite interesting to note that feeding activity is governed by water temperature where it ceases when temperatures drop below 73 degree Fahrenheit.


Masters of their domain in the Florida Everglades, the American Alligator's primaeval design is awe inspiring to observe.source


1 коментара:

Anonymous said...

Terrific work! This is the type of information that should be shared around the web. Shame on the search engines for not positioning this post higher!

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